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Four Things You May Have Missed about the PPP Change of Ownership Notice

As previously discussed, on October 2, 2020, the SBA published Procedural Notice 5000-20057 addressing Paycheck Protection Program Loans and Changes of Ownership. Based on a review of memos on the subject by other law firms and accounting firms, four items stood out as not being regularly addressed (in addition to some expressing the mistaken belief that buyers have to assume the PPP loan in any asset transaction).

1. Any Merger Triggers the Procedural Notice.

The definition of a change of ownership includes any merger of the PPP borrower with or into another entity.  Even if the PPP borrower is the surviving entity and there is no change in shareholder ownership, it would appear to be pulled into the SBA Procedural Notice. Accordingly, either internal reorganizations or acquisitions could trigger the obligations of the Procedural Notice if structured as a merger.

2. Stock Transfers Between Existing Shareholders Can Trigger Procedural Notice.

Stock transfers to affiliates and existing owners are covered, not just sales to new owners. Any change in shareholder composition that results in a greater than 50% change since the receipt of the PPP loan triggers a change of ownership of ownership under the Procedural Notice.

3. Silence as to Already Completed Changes of Ownership.

The SBA Procedural Notice does not provide any guidance for what should be done about changes in ownership that closed prior to the publication of the Notice. The significance of this silence is then either amplified or minimized, depending on one’s

Buyers’ obligation to assume PPP debt hinges on need for SBA approval

The Small Business Administration recently published a procedural notice on changes of ownership for PPP borrowers. One specific area where we’ve seen confusion is whether the procedural notice requires a buyer to assume all of the PPP borrower’s obligations in an asset sale transaction. As discussed below, while the procedural notice does require the buyer to assume the PPP loan obligations in an asset sale in order to obtain the SBA’s prior approval, so long as the SBA’s prior approval is not required, then the parties remain free to structure the asset transaction in whatever manner makes economic sense for the parties, including leaving the PPP loan obligations with the seller.

Section 2.b. of the procedural notice indicates that, in connection with obtaining SBA pre-approval for a change of ownership, that SBA approval “will be conditioned on the purchasing entity assuming all of the PPP borrower’s obligations under the PPP loan, including responsibility for compliance with the PPP loan terms.” The procedural notice goes on to indicate that the purchase or sale agreement “must include appropriate language regarding the assumption of the PPP borrower’s obligations under the PPP loan by the purchasing person or entity, or a separate assumption agreement must be submitted to the SBA.” Accordingly, if SBA pre-approval is required in connection with a change of control structured as an asset sale, then it would be necessary to have the

Analysis of PPP Borrowers: Who Returned Funds?

Under the CARES Act, the U.S. Treasury and Small Business Administration established the Paycheck Protection Program, a forgivable loan program for small businesses.  While public companies were eligible to participate, on April 23, 2020, the U.S. Treasury published new guidance suggesting public company participants who could not demonstrate sufficient need could be subject to scrutiny unless they return the funds. We previously wrote about a framework for borrowers to analyze their certification risks.

Most public company recipients of Paycheck Protection Program loans have elected not to return the funds.  Based on a review of SEC filings and published SBA data, this post on Bryan Cave Leighton Paisner’s banking blog, BankBCLP.com, analyzes the statistics to see who returned Paycheck Protection Program loans.  Among the findings, 88% of public borrowers that received PPP loans elected to retain their PPP proceeds and 75% of borrowers approved for PPP loans of between $5 and $10 million did the same.

Read more here.

SEC reportedly investigating public disclosures by PPP loan recipients

We understand that several issuers and regulated entities that publicly disclosed their receipt of funds from the SBA’s Paycheck Protection Program (PPP), established by the Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security (CARES) Act, have received requests for information from the SEC’s Division of Enforcement. In general, the requested information appears to concern the recipients’ eligibility and need for PPP funds, the financial impact on recipients of the pandemic and government response, and recipients’ assessment of their viability and access to funding.

This SEC outreach is rumored to be part of a sweep styled In the Matter of Certain Paycheck Protection Program Loan Recipients. The SEC is reportedly investigating whether certain recipients’ excessively positive or insufficiently negative statements in recent 10-Qs may have been inconsistent with certifications made in PPP applications regarding the necessity of funding. These information requests are voluntary at this time, and it appears that not all PPP loan recipients are receiving document requests. There may be a correlation between large funding amounts and SEC scrutiny, both in terms of attracting interest and avoiding the impact of the SBA’s announced safe harbor for loans less than $2 million (though the safe harbor does not explicitly affect the SEC). Recent news reports indicate that the Department of Justice  Fraud Section also is investigating possible misconduct by PPP loan applicants. Initial DOJ actions have focused on potential overstatement of payroll costs and/or employee headcount, as well as misuse of PPP proceeds.  While existing allegations appear focused on extreme behavior, as

Paycheck Protection Program: Analyzing Borrower Certification Risks

The shifting narratives around the government’s interpretations regarding eligibility for participation in the Paycheck Protection Program (PPP) has caused many borrowers to reconsider their own applications and to consider exiting the program by returning PPP funds by the government’s current safe harbor return deadline of May 14th.

As part of the PPP loan application process, each borrower must certify that “[c]urrent economic uncertainty makes this loan request necessary to support the ongoing operations of the Applicant.”  This certification is one of seven certifications that borrowers must certify in good faith as part of the PPP loan application.  Neither the PPP loan application nor the text of the certification has been changed since implementation of the PPP on April 3, 2020.

With the backdrop of increasing criticism with regard to a small number of PPP borrowers, in a series of informal guidance releases, the Treasury and SBA have provided further guidance on what the Treasury and SBA appear to believe is required by this certification.

On April 23, 2020, the Treasury published FAQ 31 providing “Borrowers must make this certification in good faith, taking into account their current business activity and their ability to access other sources of liquidity sufficient to support their ongoing operations in a manner that is not significantly detrimental to the business.  For example, it is unlikely that a public company with substantial market value and access to capital markets will be able to make the required certification in good faith, and such a company should be

Public company PPP participants with liquidity alternatives beware: New U.S. Treasury guidance allows safe harbor for return of funds by May 7, 2020 in cases of insufficient need

Reportedly more than 100 public companies received more than half a billion dollars of funds available under the SBA’s Paycheck Protection Program.  On April 23, 2020, the U.S. Department of Treasury published new guidance suggesting public company participants who could not demonstrate sufficient need could be subject to scrutiny unless they return the funds by May 7, 2020.

PPP applications require certification that “[c]urrent economic uncertainty makes this loan request necessary to support ongoing operations.”  To the extent that public companies may have had other reliable, accessible sources of capital markets funding, the borrower’s certification of economic need could be called into question.  In light of this new guidance, public companies should analyze the risks associated with participation in the PPP.

April 23, 2020 Treasury Guidance – PPP FAQ Question 31

The Treasury guidance focuses on sources of potential liquidity other than potential participation in the PPP. The U.S. Treasury posits: “Borrowers must make this certification in good faith, taking into account their current business activity and their ability to access other sources of liquidity sufficient to support their ongoing operations in a manner that is not significantly detrimental to the business. For example, it is unlikely that a public company with substantial market value and access to capital markets will be able to make the required certification in good faith, and such a company should be prepared to demonstrate to SBA, upon request, the basis for its certification”.

Treasury provides a safe harbor for applications filed prior to

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