The SEC announced on October 7, 2002 that it had approved, by vote of 3-2, a proposed limited conditional exemption for individuals acting as “finders” in private market transactions with accredited investors.  The text of the proposed exemption can be found here.

When small businesses engage in capital raising transactions in reliance on exemptions from registration under the Securities Act of 1933 (the “1933 Act”), they often look to “finders” to assist in identifying and, in some cases, soliciting potential investors.  Such finders (and issuers using them) must determine whether they are required to register as “broker dealers” under the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 (the “1934 Act”). In making that assessment, finders and issuers (and their legal counsel) have been left to parse through various no-action letters and SEC enforcement actions to discern the SEC’s regulatory position.  In that context, certain activities, as well as the presence of “transaction-based compensation” in these arrangements, have proved to be particularly nettlesome. The proposal would provide a non-exclusive safe harbor from broker registration, and would enable those who qualify to receive transaction-based compensation.

The proposal would be limited to natural persons, and would create two categories: Tier I Finders and Tier II Finders.  Both tiers would be subject certain conditions:

  • the issuer must not be required to file reports under the 1934 Act and must be conducting the offering in reliance on an applicable exemption from registration under the 1933 Act;
  • the finder must not engage in a “general